The buzz about Web 3.0

I recently was a guest at a really interesting meeting of a new consulting firm. We talked about cloud computing and Web 3.0 and various other ‘hot’ technology topics. Since the participants were at various levels of understanding of these technologies prior to the meeting, they assembled a reading list for those who were less experienced to come up to speed. Among the readings was a guest blog post on TechCrunchIT written by Marc Benioff, CEO of Salesforce.com. It characterized the evolution of the web this way:

  • Web 1.0 allowed everyone to transact, by taking away the cost and access barriers to certain types of transactions that were previously somewhat exclusive and expensive, for example trades at a brokerage house, purchases at an auction etc.
  • Web 2.0 allowed everyone to participate, by taking away the cost barriers to publication and geographical and timing barriers to making personal connections. As a result of Web 2.0, pretty much anyone can blog, wiki, network, etc., largely for free.
  • Web 3.0 allows everyone to innovate, by taking away the technology and capital barriers to creation of digital applications. As a result of Web 3.0, pretty much anyone can inexpensively create an application for their own purposes, to share with others or to sell for a profit. No more waiting for the big software company to solve your problem; you can solve it yourself cheaply and easily.
  • As a non-techologist, I am particularly excited about Web 3.0. Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 gave me faster, better, cheaper ways to do things I was already able to do on my own without the web. Taken to its logical conclusion, Web 3.0 will expand my skill set, and the skill set of many people who are much more creative than I, to do things that were well beyond our reach in the past. That’s worth all the buzz that technology marketers are creating about it.

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